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Full Stack Hack – A Learning Hackathon

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Screen Shot 2018-04-20 at 10.08.47

Next Thursday (26th April) and Friday (27th April) we are running a Full Stack Hackathon in London. The goal of the Hackathon is to give you, the developer a chance to work with three of the most compelling technologies for building modern Applications, specifically Node.js,  Apacha Kafka and MongoDB.

Why these three technologies? Well, they are all at the forefront of the revolution in MicroServices and scalable web architectures, they are all Open Source and they all put the JSON data format front and centre of their design.

At 7.00pm on Thursday we will all get together at 15 Hatfields in London to start building teams.

 

Each team can have a minimum of two and a maximum of 5 team members. If you want to build a team and you have an idea, this is the time to pitch your ideas. Focus on the idea of a Minimum Viable Product.

Remember you only have Friday to build your app. There will be plenty of pizza beer and soft-drinks on hand to ensure no one goes hungry or thirsty. Everyone who turns up will get swag bag of goodies from all the vendors including tee-shirts, pens, stickers etc. etc.

On Friday we start bright and early.  The team will be there from 8.00an but we expect people to arrive at 9.00am. We will provide breakfast rolls, tea and coffee and we will refresh the pitches from last night. This is when we finalise the teams for the day.

After that its full speed hacking until 4.30pm. There will be a break for lunch which we will provide and there will be snacks and soft-drinks available throughout the day.

There will be experts on hand from Nearform, MongoDB and Confluent to help you with your hacking challenge.

At 4.30pm, each team will pitch and demo their projects. Each team gets 5 minutes. Then myself, Tim Berglund and Conor O’Neill will decide on a winner.  Each member of the winning team will receive an Amazon Echo Dot.

What will the winning team look like? They will have used all the technologies in a compelling way to build a minimum viable product that blows our socks off.

Once prize giving is done we will retire to a local pub to celebrate the day with craft beer. We are buying!

All this for the low low fee of £10.  Register now, spaces are limited. We can’t wait to see you on the day.

 

 

 

Written by Joe

April 20, 2018 at 11:05 am

Connecting to MongoDB Atlas

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Atlas is the MongoDB database as a service offering. With Atlas, you can create fully managed MongoDB databases on AWS, Google Cloud, and Azure. If you have been playing around with MongoDB locally you will know how trivially easy it is for clients and servers to connect.

Servers listen by default on port 27017 and clients by default expect to connect to localhost:27017. With Atlas, we need to connect to a remote server that expects both a username and password and an SSL connection.  But don’t worry Atlas makes this super easy to configure.

First login to your Atlas cluster at cloud.mongodb.com. Here is my login page.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 09.49.15

Now click the connect button. This will pop up the following screen.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 09.49.31

You want to scroll down to the Connect Your Application and click there.

This will open up the Connection string screen.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 09.49.46

You now need to decide whether you are using the latest drivers (3.6) or an earlier version. When you originally created the cluster you selected a specific version of the server on the Create cluster page.

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 10.18.26

If you are using a 3.6 driver then the server will be configured to use the new seedlist configuration format.

If you click on that link you will get a window displaying the correct connection string.

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This string is hard to read on the screenshot so we can reproduce it here.

mongodb+srv://jdrumgoole:<PASSWORD>@mugalyser-ffp4c.mongodb.net/test

Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 09.50.06

For the 3.4 and earlier drivers, we use the old format MongoDB URI connection string.

mongodb://jdrumgoole:<PASSWORD>@mugalyser-shard-00-00-ffp4c.mongodb.net:27017,mugalyser-shard-00-01-ffp4c.mongodb.net:27017,mugalyser-shard-00-02-ffp4c.mongodb.net:27017/test?ssl=true&replicaSet=MUGAlyser-shard-0&authSource=admin

 

In both cases, you will need to supply the password that you created for your user. Note this is the password for the database, not your Atlas login password.

Written by Joe

March 22, 2018 at 10:30 am

Posted in joedrumgoole

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Event Sourcing : The Best Ubiquitous Design Pattern You Have Never Heard Of

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This is a talk on Event Sourcing I did last year at the O’Reilly Software Engineering Conference in London.

The slides are included below as well.

Written by Joe

August 31, 2017 at 9:13 am

Posted in joedrumgoole

Bitcoin Bubble?

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soap-bubbles-817094_1920

Around Christmas last year (2016) I was doing some internal training on Bitcoin and Blockchain for sales staff at MongoDB. This was nothing too heavy but as part of the process I reckoned that if I was going to understand this thing I would buy some as part of the process. I bought two tranches of €100, the first in December 2016 and the second (just before a talk at UCD on the same topic) in January 2017. There was a €3 transaction fee for each purchase.

I did occasionally look at the Bitcoin prices and watched its ups and downs. Eventually when it seemed to be at an all time high in May 2016 I cashed out my original €200. I kind of forgot about the residue until last night. I checked the price around 12pm.

€388 euro.

Feels bubblish to me 🙂

Screen Shot 2017-08-30 at 08.54.40

Written by Joe

August 30, 2017 at 7:56 am

Posted in Bitcoin, joedrumgoole

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The Ultimate MVP : The Saturn 5 Rocket

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Saturn 5 Rocket

Saturn 5 on its Launch pad

Most people in larger companies look at the lean-startup movement and think it doesn’t apply to them (despite much of its inspiration coming from a very large company, Toyota). Well NASA ran a very successful Minimum Viable Product through the 1960’s called the Apollo program.

The Apollo program had a simple goal, put a man on the moon.  Every part of the mission was dedicated to that end. So although the Saturn V rocket is the largest rocket every built it was completely disposable apart from the Command Module that returned to Earth with the astronauts. Even that was discarded once the astronauts had been recovered.

There was no attempt to design reuse for trips to other planets or reuse in the mission of space station building. They reused extensive design knowledge gained in the design of Mercury and  Gemini and space missions and focussed on design simplicity and remote monitoring as opposed to onboard maitainance to resolve problems.

Most importantly, they recognized that the short duration of Apollo missions meant that the parts and sub-systems did not need to undergo the rigor of prolonged testing in the harsh environment of Space.

They wouldn’t have called it that at the time but they were engaging in lean design and adopting lean startup principles.

  • Minimum Viable Product: A rocket to put a man on the moon and bring him back
  • Reuse of standard components: Many of the sub-systems for Gemini and Mercury were carried straight across
  • No Over design: Design for the current mission, a short duration trip to the Moon, no a long duration flight to Mars.
  • Rapid Iteration: 11 Apollo missions in 8 years culminating in Apollo 11 that put a man on the moon
  • Failed Experiments:  Apollo 1 resulted in a mission fire that killed all three astronauts, apollo

So next time someone says MVP is a the new new thing. Tell ’em about the Apollo program.

Written by Joe

February 15, 2016 at 9:29 pm

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MongoDB Meetups – Dublin, London

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spark

Come and meet Bryan Reinero in Dublin and/or London at MongoDB user Group meetings that are happening in March on the 16th and 18th.

Bryan will be give an overview of MongoDB 3.2 and show us how to integrate Spark and MongoDB.

There will be beers and pizza. Hope to see you all there.

Written by Joe

February 12, 2016 at 2:11 pm

Posted in joedrumgoole, MongoDB

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My Every Day Electronics Carry

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everyday-carry

  1. US USB power adaptor
  2. Ethernet connector for MacBook Air (so far never used but its only been a month)
  3. US plug adaptor for Apple power block
  4. VGA dongle for Mac (amazingly this is the first one I bought and I still have it)
  5. USB to USB connector (male to female)
  6. USB to printer form factor connector
  7. USB dongle with attachment to allow it to read/write MicroSD cards
  8. Another USB form factor convertor
  9. Universal plug adaptor (works everywhere). Got this in Frys. Its great ‘cos it has a USB power point built in
  10. Three MIFI
  11. Mac iPad Cable (also can be used to charge iPhones)
  12. MicroUSB cable
  13. Verizon LTE MIFI (for USA)
  14. USB extension cable
  15. USB hub
  16. Ethernet (use to roll up but the spring is broken)
  17. MicroUSB car charger

Not shown is my MacBook Air, my Samsung Galaxy G4 and their associated chargers. I carry all this stuff in a transparent Ziplock bag so I can easily see what I am looking for. My backpack of choice (not shown) is a Lowe Alpine computer backpack, I favour it because it comes with a slip on waterproof cover which is great for cycling in Irish weather.

Written by Joe

August 17, 2013 at 3:03 pm